F-100 Stories (and the F-4 too)

Happy Veteran’s Day!

The Super Sabre Society has invited Arnold and me to talk at their next reunion in San Antonio in the spring of 2019. Yes, it’s a little far out, but I’m already looking forward to it! We’ll be talking about the F-100 of course, not the E-1 and homebuilt aircraft, but I suppose the E-1 could come up since the F-100 played a role in the E-1’s aileron design. Also, Arnold’s experiences in flying the F-100 long distances gave him the confidence that he could stay awake for an 18-hour flight.

The Super Sabre Society has posted some of Arnold’s writings about the early days of the F-100. You can read these at https://supersabresociety.com/ever-wonder-like-fly-f-100a-1955/.

I also published an article about the F-100 and the 1955 Bendix Race in Air & Space magazine that you can read here: https://www.airspacemag.com/military-aviation/when-slower-was-faster-1-180952131/

Here’s a couple of pictures of Arnold with the F-100, one in Vietnam in 1968 and one taken with a display F-100 at Luke AFB in Arizona during a Veteran’s Day trip last year:

Since it’s Veteran’s Day, here’s a picture of me too, from my days flying in the backseat of F-4s at Edwards AFB (circa 1988). This particular RF-4C even had my name stenciled on the rear canopy:

 

Oshkosh Schedule for The Propeller under the Bed

I will be giving my presentation, “A Brief History of Homebuilt Aircraft,” at EAA’s AirVenture in Oshkosh, Wisconsin on Thursday, July 27, 8:30 a.m. After the presentation, I’ll be signing my book at the Sky Shoppe (EAA will be selling books) until 10:30.

I’ll also be signing books at the Sky Shoppe on Friday, July 28, 4:30-5:30 p.m. and then at the EAA Wearhouse on Saturday, July 29, 1:30-2:30 p.m.

If you have already purchased a book and would like me to sign it, please feel free to bring it to the signing.

I hope to see some of you there!

 

Harvey Field Book Signing

I just wanted to post a few pictures from the book signing at Harvey Field last weekend (May 6). The weather was great and 50+ people came out; at least a few of them flew in! We sold almost 40 books and Arnold and I gave a short presentation about noon. Everyone ate most of the sandwiches, fruit, and spreads we set out, but there were plenty of chocolates and cookies left over for the hungry flight instructors.

Here’s a few pictures:

Some attendees at the book signing

The books!

Some E-1 memorabilia

Many thanks to all who helped me get this set up: Christi Otness, my sisters Kelly and Maureen, Vladimir Ursachii (who helped with the computers and celebrated forty years of skydiving a few days after the event), and all the Harvey Field employees that helped with every little detail from Facebook announcements to ordering the books for sale.

Events, Events!

I’m adding an events page, but here are some upcoming presentations and book signings:

April 22, 2017: Presentation on “A Brief History of Homebuilt Aircraft” at the EAA Chapter 186 meeting in Manassas, Virginia. I’ll sign books for anyone that brings a copy, but I didn’t have time to arrange for book sales for this event. The meeting starts at 10:00 am and my presentation will be at about 11:00 am followed by a BBQ! Click here for more information.

May 3, 2017: Literary Voices at the University of Washington, beginning at 6:00 pm. I’ll be one of about thirty authors at this event! It’s a bit pricey, but click here for more information if you are interested.

May 6, 2017: Book signing at Harvey Airfield in Snohomish, Washington, from 11:00 am until 3 pm. I will be giving a short presentation at noon and my father will be there also. Books will be available for sale and we’ll also have refreshments. Click here for directions to Harvey Airfield.

July 7, 2017 at 10:15 am and July 8, 2018 at 12:45 pm, I’ll be giving a presentation on “A Brief History of Homebuilt Aircraft” and signing books at the Arlington Fly-In in Arlington, Washington. I believe we will have books for sale, but I’ll confirm that at a later date. Click here for more information on the Fly-In.

I’m planning to do something at Oshkosh of course, but I don’t yet have confirmed dates/times, etc.

The Propeller under the Bed: Getting Closer to Release

The books have been printed and I got my first author’s copy in the mail on Monday! I promptly repackaged it and sent it to my father so he would have the honor of seeing it first since, without him, there would have been no book. Here’s a photo of that first book:

Propeller Book Photo

The Book in Final Form

Yesterday (Saturday) nine more copies arrived for me and I noticed that Amazon moved up their shipping date from 13 April to 16 March. I’m not exactly sure what that means, but I hope it means that those of you who pre-ordered will be getting your books soon! Barnes & Noble has always showed a shipping date of 21 March.

So what’s next? I had been thinking about having a book launch party in April, but with the possibility of a March release now, that might be a moot point. Whatever happens with the launch, I’m planning to have a book signing at Harvey Field on 6 May, from 11:00 am until 3:00 pm, so mark your calendars! I’ll give a short presentation at about noon and Arnold will be there also to talk and answer questions. There will also be some light refreshments. More details to follow as it gets closer. I’m hoping to do other book signings as well, in Washington State, at Oshkosh and in the DC area (I moved back to northern Virginia in mid-February of this year), but nothing firm has been set up yet.

Writing a book has been a lifelong dream for me, but I never expected that it would turn into a project about my family and the dreams of thousands of other amateur aircraft homebuilders throughout the world. During my research, I gained a much better understanding of not only the history of aviation in the United States but also learned much about my own parents and other relatives. I feel very fortunate to have had this opportunity to document all of this for future generations to enjoy.

Many thanks to all of you who have helped me on this journey that began in September 2012 with a vague idea about writing a book using my mother’s idea for a title. Knowing people out there cared about this project was encouraging in itself, but many of you also provided feedback on my early drafts and I always appreciated the “Likes” and encouraging comments you made on the blog. The blog itself produced occasional surprises–I’ve lost track of the number of people who were stationed at Foster AFB in the 1950s who have contacted me! So thank you again for all your support and I hope to see you at a book signing!

Propeller is Now Available for Pre-Order

Propeller now has an official release date: April 13! It can be pre-ordered at Amazon, B&N, etc (if you don’t want to click on the links, just go to the website and type “The Propeller under the Bed” into the search box and it pops right up). Both Amazon and B&N are selling pre-orders at a 20% discount. B&N shows it shipping on March 21, although that might be an error.

If you would like to pre-order with a 30% discount, you can call Hopkins Fulfillment Service at 1-800-537-5487; use discount code WST30.

I just about had a heart attack when I saw it for sale online! I’m starting to feel like a real writer now …

Book Release Update

Last Saturday, the Spring 2017 University of Washington Press Catalog arrived in my mailbox, and what a nice surprise: Propeller is on page 6! Here’s a scan of the page:

Propeller's Page in Spring 2017 UW Press catalog

Propeller’s Page in Spring 2017 UW Press catalog

I finished the index on Tuesday and sent it in, so now there’s nothing to do but wait for the presses to do their thing. Assuming I did the index right of course–this was my first index, so I wouldn’t be surprised if it gets kicked back for some edits. Even with my dubious indexing skills, everything appears to be on track for pre-release copies in February and the full release in April. In the meantime, here’s a link to a “book trailer” if you’d like to check it out:

The E-1 Moves to Oshkosh

Last Tuesday, October 18, was a big day for Arnold and the E-1! Several helpers loaded the disassembled E-1 onto a truck for transport to the EAA Museum at Oshkosh. I just got word that the E-1 arrived safely in Oshkosh two days ago (October 25). The current plan is for the museum to put the E-1 on display in a few months.

When I was at AirVenture, we discussed the possibility of the E-1 being displayed along with Ed Lesher’s Teal, the aircraft that held the C-1a straight-line distance record from 1975 until Gary Hertzler broke it in 1984. Gary is still flying his VariEze, but maybe it will be in the museum someday also (don’t worry, Gary, I’m not trying to rush you).

The other homebuilt aircraft to hold the record (set in 1957), Juhanni Heinonen’s HK-1, is in the Finnish Aviation Museum near Helsinki; it is still the only Finnish aircraft to ever set a world record. But back to the E-1!

Here are some pictures of the loading at Harvey Field in Snohomish (all photos are courtesy of my sister, Kelly Mercier). First, lift the fuselage out of the hangar and load it.

Fuselage loading

Picking up the fuselage with a forklift

Next, lift the wings and load them:

Loading the wings

Loading the wings

Will they fit?

Will they fit?

Will they fit?

No sweat!

No sweat

Wings and fuselage in the container — not even close!

Next, tie everything down and add padding where the parts might contact the sides of the container. Say goodbye to airplane. Sob!

All tied down

All tied down and saying one last goodbye

Wave goodbye. Now I think my father must know how my mother felt when she waved goodbye at Sky Harbor Airport in Phoenix as he left for Vietnam in 1968.

Truck leaving for Oshkosh

Onward to Oshkosh!

I should be getting the proofs for the book in the next couple of weeks. More work, but I’m really looking forward to this last stage of the production process. I’m also working on a book trailer and will give you a peek at that once it’s respectable (many thanks to my niece, Mary Skomerza, for her help on that).

Editing, Editing

As I type this, Arnold is getting the E-1 ready to ship to Oshkosh, where it will become part of the collection in the EAA Museum. He had originally planned to fly the E-1 back to Wisconsin, but he’s been having some engine problems, so he decided to ship it instead. It will have to be disassembled for shipping, so I’ll try to get some pictures for posting!

I had a great time at Oshkosh in July, as usual (I can’t imagine NOT having a great time at Oshkosh). About thirty people showed up for my presentation on the history of homebuilt aircraft, and they seemed to really like it. Please let me know if you are interested in a presentation for your organization (e.g., EAA chapter or anyone interested in aviation). I can easily do something in Ohio or Washington State, and with some advance notice, I can travel to other places as well. The presentation is about 45 minutes long, but I can adjust to fit other time requirements.

I’ve been working with Propeller‘s copyeditor for the past couple of weeks and am down to the last three chapters. I hope to have everything completed by the end of next week so I can enjoy my long Labor Day weekend!

The next step in the process will be to review the proofs, which is the first time I’ll see what the book is going to really look like. If everything goes right, that should happen in November.

From there, I have to prepare an index. I’ve never done an index before, so that might be a bit of an adventure! Fortunately, I got some guidance from UW Press and I also found a book about preparing an index. I had no idea that preparing an index would be popular enough to warrant a book. These days, it seems there is a book on just about everything!

Publication Date and Oshkosh

Just a quick update — I’ve been very busy finishing up my manuscript and getting ready for Oshkosh! If the publication schedule stays on track, Propeller will be available in the spring of 2017. The title is now The Propeller Under the Bed: A Personal History of Homebuilt Aircraft.

I’m going to be giving a presentation at Oshkosh, A Brief History of Homebuilt Aircraft, on Thursday, July 28, at 8:30 a.m. in the Homebuilder’s Hangar (near the flightline). The presentation is based on material from the book. If you’re at Oshkosh on Thursday, please stop by!

I have also been in touch with EAA about being part of their Author’s Corner next year. It should be an exciting year!